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Author Guidelines

1. General Guidelines
All submitted manuscripts should be written based on original research. Authors are strongly recommended to submit their manuscripts through our Open Access Journal system at the following address:

http://ejournal.upi.edu/index.php/ije/about/submissions#onlineSubmissions


Please register as author in order to submit your manuscript. Registering to the site will also allow authors to be reviewer and reader.
A short CV, not more than 80 words, of all contributors or authors should be submitted as a supplementary file. The CV should contain the author’s position, fields of interest, research areas, and activities.

Jurnal Psikologi Insight does not charge any article processing charges and submission fees.

All manuscripts submitted to Jurnal Psikologi Insight are screened for plagiarism with turnitin.


2. Manuscript Preparation Guidelines
Manuscripts should be prepared according to the following author guidelines:

2.1. General Guidelines

  1. Manuscripts must include an introduction, a description of the method, a summary of the findings, a discussion on the implications of the findings, conclusions, and references;
  2. The manuscripts should normally be between 4,000 to 6,000 words or between 12-15 pages with single spacing.
  3. Below the abstract, about three to five keywords should appear together with the main body of the article with the font size 10.
  4. The Journal operates a peer review process and promotes blind reviewing. To facilitate this process, author’s names (without academic titles), institutional affiliations, and the email address of the corresponding author should appear only on a detachable cover sheet.
  5. Manuscripts should be written in Indonesian or English in single space, using Microsoft Word, font size 12, Times New Roman, top and left margin 3 cm, bottom and right margin 3 cm, printed in Letters.
  6. Insert a header on even page indicating  a few words of the title of the manuscripts  and on odd page insert the author(s) name.
  7. Footnotes should appear at the end of the text. Page number should be inserted at the bottom, placed on the center.
  8. Write the main body of the article in one columns. Use first line indent of 1 cm for every paragraph.
  9. Block citation should be 0,5 cm indented with the font size 12.
  10. The title should be less than 12 words, capitalized, centered, Cambria Headings, with font zize 16.
  11. Use only horizontal lines when using tables. Put table number and the title of the table on top of it.
  12. Every source cited in the body of the article should appear in the reference, and all sources appearing in the reference should be cited in the body of the article.
  13. The sources cited should at least 80% come from those published in the last 10 years. The sources cited are primary sources in the forms of journal manuscripts, books, and research reports.
  14. Citation is done using bracket (last name and year of publication). When the sources are cited verbatim, page number is included (p. 78 or pp. 78-89 in English) or (hal. 78 atau hal. 78-79).
  15. Quotation and references follows APA style and the latter should be included at the end of the article in the following examples:

Amalia, A. (2012).  The use of video in teaching writing procedural text: A quasi-experimental study in one of Senior High Schools in Bandung (Skripsi, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia, 2012). Retrieved 12th January, 2012 from http://repository.upi.edu/skripsiview.php?no_skripsi=11587

Braten, I. & Strømsø, H.I. (2005). The rela­tionship between epistemo­logical be­liefs, implicit theories of intelligence, and self-regulated learning among Nor­wegian postsecondary students. Brit­ish Journal of Educational Psychol­ogy, 75, 539–565

Chan, K. (2007). Hong Kong Teacher Edu­ca­tion student’s Epistemo­logical Be­liefs and their Relations with Concep­tions of Learning and Learning Stra­tegies. The Asia Pacific-Education Researcher, 16 (2), 199-214.

Davis, E.A. (1997). Students. Epistemo­logi­cal Beliefs about Science and Learning. Paper presented at the An­nual Meeting of the American Educa­tional Research Association, Chi­cago, IL.

Eggen, P. & Kauchak, D. (1997). Educati­onal Psychology, Windows on Class­­­room. Third edition. Upper Sad­dle River, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Faizza, R.N. (2009). Pengaruh dukungan sosial terhadap resilien narapidana remaja di Lembaga Pemasyarakatan Anak Blitar. Skripsi. Fakultas Psikologi Universitas Islam Maulana Malik Ibrahim, Malang. Tidak diterbitkan

Feinstein, S., Baartman, J., Buboltz, M., Sonnichsen, K., Solomon, R (2008).  Resiliency in Adolescent Males in a Correctional Facility. The Journal of Correctional Education, 59 (2) June 2008.

Gulacti, F. (2010). The effect of perceived social support on subjective well-being. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences. (2).hal 3844–3849

Handayani, T.P (2010). Kesejahteraan Psikologis Narapidana Remaja di Lembaga Pemasyarakatan Anak Kutoarjo, Studi Kualitatif Fenomenologis. Skripsi. Fakultas Psikologi. Universitas Diponegoro (online)

Hunston, S. & Oakey, D. (2010). Introducing applied linguistics: Concepts and skills. New York, NY: Routledge.

Johnson, L., Lewis, K., Peters, M., Harris, Y., Moreton, G., Morgan, B. et al. (2005). How far is far? London: McMillan.

Palmer, R. (in press). A third way: online labs integrated with print materials. Indonesian Journal of Applied Linguistics.

Weisz, J. R., McCabe, M. & Dennig, M.D. (1994). Primary and secondary control among children undergoing medical procedures: Adjustment as a function of coping style. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (62) 324-332.

Whitehead, D.L & Steptoe, A. (2007). Prison. In Fink, G (Ed). Encyclopedia of Stress. 2nd edition. Volume 3. pp. 217-221. e-book edition.

Windle, M. (1992). A longitudinal study of stress buffering for adolescent problem behaviors. Developmental Psychology, 28, 522–530

Wong, P.T.P. (2011). Positive Psychology 2.0; Toward a Balanced Interactive Model of The Good Life. Journal Canadian Psychology. (online) 52.2.69-81. (Akses: 21/11/13)

 

2.2. Abstract

The abstract must include what were the main purposes of the study? Who was studied (sample, sample size, special characteristics)? How were participants selected? What type of design was used? What were the main findings and conclusions? It should be kept as brief as possible, not exceeding 300 words in English and Indonesian.

2.3. Introduction

The introduction should consist of what is the background and context for the study? What is the current theory? research, or what makes this study useful, important, or of interest? What is different or special about the study in focus, methods, or design to address a need in the area? Is the rationale clear regarding the constructs to be assessed? What specifically were the purposes, predictions, or hypotheses?

2.4. Method

The method section consists of description concerning the research participants, design, data sources, data collection, and data analysis with the proportion of  10-15% of the total article length, all presented in the form of paragraphs. The description of method element  was:

Participants

Who were the participants and how many of them were there in this study? Why was this sample selected in light of the research goals? How was this sample obtained, recruited, and selected? What are the participant and demographic characteristics of the sample (e.g., gender, age, ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status)?

Design

What is the design (e.g., longitudinal, cross-sectional) and how does the design relate to the goals of the study? How were participants assigned to groups or conditions? How many groups were included in the design? How were the groups similar and different in how they were treated in the study? Why were these groups critical to address the questions of interest?

Assessment

What were the constructs of interest and how were they measured? What are the relevant reliability and validity data from previous research (and from the present study) that support the use of these measures for the present purposes? Were multiple measures and methods used to assess the constructs? Are response sets or styles relevant to the use and interpretation of the measures? How was the assessment conducted? By whom (as assessors/observers)? In what order were the measures administered? If judges (raters) were used in any facet of assessment, what is the reliability (inter- or intrajudge consistency) in rendering their j udgments/rati ngs?

Procedures

Where was the study conducted (setting)? What materials, equipment, or apparatuses were used in the study? What was the chronological sequence of events to which participants were exposed? What intervals elapsed between different aspects of the study (e.g., assessment occasions)? What procedural checks were completed to avert potential sources of bias in implementation of the manipulation and assessments? What checks were made to ensure that the conditions were carried out as intended? What other information does the reader need to know to understand how participants were treated and what conditions were provided?

 

2.5. Findings and Discussion

The findings and discussion section consist of a description of the results of the data analysis to answer the research question(s) and their meanings are seen from current theories and references of the area addressed. The proportion of this section is 40-60% of the total article length. Findings consist about:

What were the primary measures and data on which the predictions depend? What are the scores on the measures of interest for the different groups and sample as a whole (e.g., measures of central tendency and variability)? How do the scores compare with those of another study, normative, or standardization samples? Are groups of interest within the study similar on measures and variables that could interfere with interpretation of the hypotheses? What analyses were used and how specifically did these address the original hypotheses and purposes? Were the assumptions of the data analyses met? If multiple tests were used, what means were provided to control error rates? If more than one group was delineated, were they similar on variables that might otherwise explain the results (e.g., diagnosis, age)? Were data missing due to incomplete measures (not filled out completely by the participants) or due to loss of participants? If so, how were these handled in the data analyses? Are there ancillary analyses that might further inform the primary analyses or exploratory analyses that might stimulate further work?

Discussion consists about: What were the major findings of the study? How do these findings add to research and how do they support, refute, or inform current theory? What alternative interpretations can be placed on the data? What limitations or qualifiers must be placed on the study given methodology and design issues? What research follows from the study to move the field forward?

 

SUBMISSION PREPARATION CHECKLIST

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

The copyright holder of the article is the author. IJE has the right of publishing it both online and printed.

 

PRIVACY STATEMENT

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  4. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  5. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
  6. If submitting to a peer-reviewed section of the journal, the instructions in Ensuring a Blind Review have been followed.
 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.