Editorial Policies

Focus and Scope

Journal of Science Learning aims to serve original articles on the latest issues and trends in high quality research and theoretical position papers concerning preservice and in-service education of science teachers. The article offers ways to improve classroom science teaching and learning, and professional development. JSL is a triangual journal issued on March, July, and November.

 The editors welcome submissions of papers describing recent theoretical and experimental research related to:

  1. The Science Learning : consisting of theoretical and empirical research studies on learning of science. We invite manuscripts that investigate learning and its change and growth from various lenses, including psychological, social, cognitive, sociohistorical, and affective. Studies examining the relationship of learning to teaching, the science knowledge and practices, the learners themselves, and the contexts (social, political, physical, ideological, institutional, epistemological, and cultural) are similarly welcome.
  2. The Science Learning in Everyday Life : consisting of analytical, interpretative, or philosophical papers regarding learning science outside of the formal classroom. Papers should investigate experiences in settings such as community, home, the Internet, after school settings, museums, and other opportunities that develop science interest, knowledge or practices across the life span. Attention to issues and factors relating to equity in science learning are especially encouraged
  3. The Science Teacher Education : consisting of original empirical and/or theoretical research that examines the preparation of teachers, the work of teachers, or how teachers' work is influenced by a broader context. "Teacher education" refers to development throughout the continuum of one’s teaching career, from pre-service, through induction, into advanced professional stages of teaching.
  4. The Science Studies and Science Education : provides a forum for interdisciplinary investigations into science and science education. It informs and derives perspectives from history, philosophy, anthropology, and sociology of science as well as cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence to contribute to the theory, methodology, policy, and practice of science education.
  5. The learning media in science learning
  6. The curriculum in Science Learning

 

Section Policies

Science Learning

Editors
  • Diana Rochintaniawati
  • Ari Widodo
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Science Learning in Everyday Life

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Science Teacher Education

Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Science Studies and Science Education

Editors
  • Diana Rochintaniawati
  • Ari Widodo
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Learning Media in Science Learning

Editors
  • Diana Rochintaniawati
  • Ari Widodo
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed

Curriculum in Science Learning

Editors
  • Diana Rochintaniawati
  • Ari Widodo
Checked Open Submissions Checked Indexed Checked Peer Reviewed
 

Peer Review Process

Newly submitted manuscripts will first be screened by the main Editors. Manuscripts may be rejected at this stage if they are of insufficient quality, outside the scope of the journal or they are considered not original. Manuscripts that do meet the minimal requirements for publication are assigned to one of the main Editors, who sends the manuscript out for review. Reviewers are selected by the main Editors on the basis of their expertise, their availability, and such as to avoid possible conflicts of interest. A reviewer is asked to evaluate whether the manuscript is scientifically sound, original, relevant, clear, whether it correctly references previous work, and whether it falls within the scope of the journal.
All research articles in this journal have undergone rigorous peer review, based on initial editor screening and anonymized refereeing by at least two anonymous referees. The acceptance or rejection of articles will be decided by the editorial boards based on the review results supplied by the reviewers. There are no communications between authors and editors concerning the rejection decision. Authors whose papers are rejected will be informed with the reasons for the rejection.
All papers are fully peer-reviewed. We only publish articles that have been reviewed and approved by highly qualified researchers with expertise in a field appropriate for the article. We used double-blind peer-reviewing process. To ensure the integrity of the blind peer-review for submission to this journal, every effort should be made to prevent the identities of the authors and reviewers from being known to each other. This involves the authors, editors, and reviewers (who upload documents as part of their review) checking to see if the following steps have been taken with regard to the text and the file properties:

  1. The authors of the document have deleted their names from the text, with "Author" and year used in the references and footnotes, instead of the authors' name, article title, etc.
  2. With Microsoft Office documents, author identification should also be removed from the properties for the file.
  3. For Microsoft 2003 and previous versions, and Macintosh versions of Word:
  4. Under the File menu select: Save As > Tools (or Options with a Mac) > Security > Remove personal information from file properties on save > Save.
  5. For MacIntosh Word 2008 (and future versions)
      • Under the File menu select "Properties."
      • Under the Summary tab remove all of the identifying information from all of the fields.
      • Save the File.
  6. For Microsoft 2007 (Windows):
      • Click on the office button in the upper-left hand corner of the office application
      • Select "Prepare" from the menu options.
      • Select "Properties" for the "Prepare" menu options.
      • Delete all of the information in the document property fields that appear under the main menu options.
      • Save the document and close the document property field section.
  7. For Microsoft 2010 (Windows):
    • Under the File menu select "Prepare for sharing."
    • Click on the "Check for issues" icon.
    • click on "inspect document" icon.
    • Uncheck all of the checkboxes except "Document Properties and Personal information".
    • Run the document inspector, which will then do a search of the document properties and indicated if any document property fields contain any information.
    • If the document inspector finds that some of the document properties contain information it will notify you and give you the option to "Remove all," which you will click to remove the document properties and personal information from the document.
  8. For PDF files:
    • With PDFs, the authors' names should also be removed from Document Properties found under File on Adobe Acrobat's main menu.

Detailed information about the flow for the manuscript submission (author) to the acceptance by the editor is shown in the following figure.

In short, the steps are:

  1. Manuscript Submission (by author) (route 1)
  2. Manuscript Check and Selection (by manager and editors) (route 2). Editors have a right to directly accept, reject, or review.
  3. Manuscript Reviewing Process (by reviewers) (route 3-4)
  4. Notification of Manuscript Acceptance, Revision, or Rejection (by editor to author based on reviewers comments) (route 5)
  5. Paper Revision (by author)
  6. Revision Submission based on Reviewer Suggestion (by author) with similar flow to point number 1. (route 1)
  7. If reviewer seems to be satisfied with revision, notification for acceptance (by editor). (route 6)
  8. Galley proof and publishing process  (route 7 and 8)

The steps point number 1 to 5 is considered as 1 round of peer-reviewing process (see yellow area in the figure). And, our reviewing process at least goes through 2 round of reviewing process.
The journal editor or editorial board considers the feedback provided by the peer reviewers and arrives at a decision. The following are the most common decisions:

  1. accept without any changes (acceptance): the journal will publish the paper in its original form
  2. accept with minor revisions (acceptance): the journal will publish the paper and asks the author to make small corrections
  3. accept after major revisions (conditional acceptance ): the journal will publish the paper provided the authors make the changes suggested by the reviewers and/or editors
  4. revise and resubmit (conditional rejection): the journal is willing to reconsider the paper in another round of decision making after the authors make major changes
  5. reject the paper (outright rejection): the journal will not publish the paper or reconsider it even if the authors make major revisions.

 

Publication Frequency

Journal of Science Learning was published three times a year in March, July, and November.

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.

User has right to:

  • Share, copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
  • Adapt, remix, transform, and build upon the material for any purpose, even commercially.


This license is acceptable for Free Cultural Works. The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms under the following terms:

  • Attribution Users must give appropriate credit, provide a link to the license, and indicate if changes were made. Users may do so in any reasonable manner, but not in any way that suggests the licensor endorses you or your use.
  • ShareAlike If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.
  • No additional restrictions — You may not apply legal terms or technological measures that legally restrict others from doing anything the license permits.

JSL by http://ejournal.upi.edu/index.php/jslearning is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

 

Archiving

This journal utilizes the LOCKSS system to create a distributed archiving system among participating libraries and permits those libraries to create permanent archives of the journal for purposes of preservation and restoration. More...

 

Publication Ethics

Journal of Science Learning partially adopted the publication ethics based on Elsevier Publication Ethics Guidelines (Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors.

 

In keeping with potential editorial conflicts of interest, manuscripts (co-)authored by one of the main Editors will be handled fully by the other main Editor in an undisclosed review process. Similar disclosure arrangements are made in the case of Associate Editors (co-)authoring a manuscript.

 

The publication of an article in a peer-reviewed journal is an essential building block in the development of a coherent and respected network of knowledge. It is a direct reflection of the quality of the work of the authors and the institutions that support them. Peer-reviewed articles support and embody the scientific method.

 

Ethics of Editors

Publication Decisions

The editor of a journal is solely and independently responsible for deciding which of the articles submitted to the journal should be published, often working in conjunction with the relevant society. The validation of the work in question and its importance to researchers and readers must always underwrite such decisions.  The editor may be constrained by such legal requirements as shall then be in force regarding issues such as libel, copyright infringement and plagiarism. The editor may confer with other editors or reviewers (or society officers) in making these decisions.

 

Peer review

The editor shall ensure that the peer review process is fair, unbiased, and timely.  Research articles must typically be reviewed by at least two external and independent reviewers, and where necessary the editor should seek additional opinions.

The editor shall select reviewers who have suitable expertise in the relevant field and shall follow best practice in avoiding the selection of fraudulent peer reviewers. The editor shall review all disclosures of potential conflicts of interest and suggestions for self-citation made by reviewers in order to determine whether there is any potential for bias.

 

Fair play.

The editor should evaluate manuscripts for their intellectual content without regard to race, gender, sexual orientation, religious belief, ethnic origin, citizenship, or political philosophy of the authors.

The editorial policies of the journal should encourage transparency and complete, honest reporting, and the editor should ensure that peer reviewers and authors have a clear understanding of what is expected of them.  The editor shall use the journal’s standard electronic submission system. The editor shall establish, along with the publisher, a transparent mechanism for appeal against editorial decisions.

 

Declaration of Competing Interests.

Any potential editorial conflicts of interest should be declared to the publisher in writing prior to the appointment of the editor, and then updated if and when new conflicts arise. The publisher may publish such declarations in the journal.

The editor must not be involved in decisions about papers which s/he has written him/herself or have been written by family members or colleagues or which relate to products or services in which the editor has an interest. Further, any such submission must be subject to all of the journal’s usual procedures, peer review must be handled independently of the relevant author/editor and their research groups, and there must be a clear statement to this effect on any such paper that is published.

 

Ethics of Reviewers

Contribution to Editorial Decisions

Peer review assists the editor in making editorial decisions and through the editorial communications with the author may also assist the author in improving the paper.  Peer review is an essential component of formal scholarly communication, and lies at the heart of the scientific method.  In addition to the specific ethics-related duties described below, reviewers are asked generally to treat authors and their work as they would like to be treated themselves and to observe good reviewing etiquette.

Any selected referee who feels unqualified to review the research reported in a manuscript or knows that its prompt review will be impossible should notify the editor and decline to participate in the review process.

 

Confidentiality.

Any manuscripts received for review must be treated as confidential documents. Reviewers must not share the review or information about the paper with anyone or contact the authors directly without permission from the editor.

Some editors encourage discussion with colleagues or co-reviewing exercises, but reviewers should first discuss this with the editor in order to ensure that confidentiality is observed and that participants receive suitable credit.

Unpublished materials disclosed in a submitted manuscript must not be used in a reviewer’s own research without the express written consent of the author. Privileged information or ideas obtained through peer review must be kept confidential and not used for personal advantage.

 

Alertness to Ethical Issues.

A reviewer should be alert to potential ethical issues in the paper and should bring these to the attention of the editor, including any substantial similarity or overlap between the manuscript under consideration and any other published paper of which the reviewer has personal knowledge. Any statement that an observation, derivation, or argument had been previously reported should be accompanied by the relevant citation.

 

Standards of Objectivity & Competing Interests.

Reviews should be conducted objectively.  Reviewers should be aware of any personal bias they may have and take this into account when reviewing a paper. Personal criticism of the author is inappropriate. Referees should express their views clearly with supporting arguments.

Reviewers should consult the Editor before agreeing to review a paper where they have potential conflicts of interest resulting from competitive, collaborative, or other relationships or connections with any of the authors, companies, or institutions connected to the papers.

If a reviewer suggests that an author includes citations to the reviewer’s (or their associates’) work, this must be for genuine scientific reasons and not with the intention of increasing the reviewer’s citation count or enhancing the visibility of their work (or that of their associates).

 

Ethics of Authors

Reporting Standards.

Authors of reports of original research should present an accurate account of the work performed as well as an objective discussion of its significance. Underlying data should be represented accurately in the paper. A paper should contain sufficient detail and references to permit others to replicate the work. Fraudulent or knowingly inaccurate statements constitute unethical behaviour and are unacceptable.

Review and professional publication articles should also be accurate and objective, and editorial ‘opinion’ works should be clearly identified as such.

 

Data Access and Retention.

Authors may be asked to provide the research data supporting their paper for editorial review and/or to comply with the open data requirements of the journal.  Authors should be prepared to provide public access to such data, if practicable, and should be prepared to retain such data for a reasonable number of years after publication. Authors may refer to their journal’s Guide for Authors for further details.

 

Originality and Acknowledgement of Sources.

The authors should ensure that they have written entirely original works, and if the authors have used the work and/or words of others, that this has been appropriately cited or quoted and permission has been obtained where necessary.

Proper acknowledgment of the work of others must always be given. Authors should cite publications that have influenced the reported work and that give the work appropriate context within the larger scholarly record. Information obtained privately, as in conversation, correspondence, or discussion with third parties, must not be used or reported without explicit, written permission from the source.

Plagiarism takes many forms, from ‘passing off’ another’s paper as the author’s own paper, to copying or paraphrasing substantial parts of another’s paper (without attribution), to claiming results from research conducted by others.  Plagiarism in all its forms constitutes unethical behaviour and is unacceptable.

 

Multiple, Redundant or Concurrent Publication.

An author should not in general publish manuscripts describing essentially the same research in more than one journal of primary publication. Submitting the same manuscript to more than one journal concurrently constitutes unethical behaviour and is unacceptable.

In general, an author should not submit for consideration in another journal a paper that has been published previously, except in the form of an abstract or as part of a published lecture or academic thesis or as an electronic preprint.

Publication of some kinds of articles (e.g. clinical guidelines, translations) in more than one journal is sometimes justifiable, provided certain conditions are met. The authors and editors of the journals concerned must agree to the secondary publication, which must reflect the same data and interpretation of the primary document. The primary reference must be cited in the secondary publication.

 

Confidentiality.

Information obtained in the course of confidential services, such as refereeing manuscripts or grant applications, must not be used without the explicit written permission of the author of the work involved in these services.

 

Authorship of the Paper.

Authorship should be limited to those who have made a significant contribution to the conception, design, execution, or interpretation of the reported study.  All those who have made substantial contributions should be listed as co-authors.

Where there are others who have participated in certain substantive aspects of the paper (e.g. language editing or medical writing), they should be recognised in the acknowledgements section.

The corresponding author should ensure that all appropriate co-authors and no inappropriate co-authors are included on the paper, and that all co-authors have seen and approved the final version of the paper and have agreed to its submission for publication.

Authors are expected to consider carefully the list and order of authors before submitting their manuscript and provide the definitive list of authors at the time of the original submission. Only in exceptional circumstances will the Editor consider (at their discretion) the addition, deletion or rearrangement of authors after the manuscript has been submitted and the author must clearly flag any such request to the Editor. All authors must agree with any such addition, removal or rearrangement.

Authors take collective responsibility for the work.  Each individual author is accountable for ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved.

 

Declaration of Competing Interests.

All authors should disclose in their manuscript any financial and personal relationships with other people or organisations that could be viewed as inappropriately influencing (bias) their work.

All sources of financial support for the conduct of the research and/or preparation of the article should be disclosed, as should the role of the sponsor(s), if any, in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the article for publication. If the funding source(s) had no such involvement then this should be stated.

Examples of potential conflicts of interest which should be disclosed include employment, consultancies, stock ownership, honoraria, paid expert testimony, patent applications/registrations, and grants or other funding. Potential conflicts of interest should be disclosed at the earliest possible stage.

Image Integrity.

It is not acceptable to enhance, obscure, move, remove, or introduce a specific feature within an image. Adjustments of brightness, contrast, or color balance are acceptable if and as long as they do not obscure or eliminate any information present in the original. Manipulating images for improved clarity is accepted, but manipulation for other purposes could be seen as scientific ethical abuse and will be dealt with accordingly.

Authors should comply with any specific policy for graphical images applied by the relevant journal, e.g. providing the original images as supplementary material with the article, or depositing these in a suitable repository.

 

Plagiarism Screening

Before going to review process, all manuscripts will be checked that they are free from plagiarism practice using "Turnitin" software. If there an indication of plagiarism, the manuscript will instantly be rejected.

 

Fees

JSL does not charge any submission or processing fees for every article received and published.

 

Manuscript Submission Guidelines

AUTHOR GUIDELINES

 

Please prepare your manuscript following the instructions for authors given below before submitting it online at below. Basically, the JSL journal follows the author guidelines of Elseiver at Elseiver Author Guidelines.

Manuscripts submitted for publication in JSL should be between 4,000 and 8,000 words or between 20 and 40 pages long when typed in double spacing including tables and figures. The abstract should maintain a maximum of 200 words.

 

PREPARATION

Use of word processing software

It is important that the file be saved in the native format of the word processor used. The text should be in single-column format. Keep the layout of the text as simple as possible. Most formatting codes will be removed and replaced on processing the article. In particular, do not use the word processor's options to justify text or to hyphenate words. However, do use bold face, italics, subscripts, superscripts etc. When preparing tables, if you are using a table grid, use only one grid for each individual table and not a grid for each row. If no grid is used, use tabs, not spaces, to align columns. The electronic text should be prepared in a way very similar to that of conventional manuscripts. Note that source files of figures, tables and text graphics will be required whether or not you embed your figures in the text. See also the section on Electronic artwork. To avoid unnecessary errors you are strongly advised to use the 'spell-check' and 'grammar-check' functions of your word processor.

 

ARTICLE STRUCTURE

Subdivision - numbered sections: Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections. Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2, ...), 1.2, etc. (the abstract is not included in section numbering). Use this numbering also for internal cross-referencing: do not just refer to 'the text'. Any subsection may be given a brief heading. Each heading should appear on its own separate line.

Introduction: State the objectives of the work and provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results.

Material and methods: Provide sufficient detail to allow the work to be reproduced. Methods already published should be indicated by a reference: only relevant modifications should be described.

Results: Results should be clear and concise.

Discussion: This should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them. A combined Results and Discussion section is often appropriate. Avoid extensive citations and discussion of published literature.

Conclusions: The main conclusions of the study may be presented in a short Conclusions section, which may stand alone or form a subsection of a Discussion or Results and Discussion section.

 

 

 

ESSENTIAL TITLE PAGE INFORMATION

Title: Concise and informative. Titles are often used in information-retrieval systems. Avoid abbreviations and formulae where possible.

Author names and affiliations: Please clearly indicate the given name(s) and family name(s) of each author and check that all names are accurately spelled. Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lower-case superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address. Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name and, if available, the e-mail address of each author.

Corresponding author. Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication. Ensure that the e-mail address is given and that contact details are kept up to date by the corresponding author.

Present/permanent address. If an author has moved since the work described in the article was done, or was visiting at the time, a 'Present address' (or 'Permanent address') may be indicated as a footnote to that author's name. The address at which the author actually did the work must be retained as the main, affiliation address. Superscript Arabic numerals are used for such footnotes.

 

ABSTRACT

A concise and factual abstract is required. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions. An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be able to stand alone. For this reason, References should be avoided, but if essential, then cite the author(s) and year(s). Also, non-standard or uncommon abbreviations should be avoided, but if essential they must be defined at their first mention in the abstract itself.

 

GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT

Although a graphical abstract is optional, its use is encouraged as it draws more attention to the online article. The graphical abstract should summarize the contents of the article in a concise, pictorial form designed to capture the attention of a wide readership. Graphical abstracts should be submitted as a separate file in the online submission system. Image size: Please provide an image with a minimum of 531 × 1328 pixels (h × w) or proportionally more. The image should be readable at a size of 5 × 13 cm using a regular screen resolution of 96 dpi. Preferred file types: TIFF, EPS, PDF or MS Office files.

 

HIGHLIGHTS

Highlights are an optional for this journal. They consist of a short collection of bullet points that convey the core findings of the article and should be submitted in a separate editable file in the online submission system. Please use 'Highlights' in the file name and include 3 to 5 bullet points (maximum 85 characters, including spaces, per bullet point).

 

KEYWORDS

Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, using American spelling and avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of'). Be sparing with abbreviations: only abbreviations firmly established in the field may be eligible. These keywords will be used for indexing purposes. Acknowledgements Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article before the references and do not, therefore, include them on the title page, as a footnote to the title or otherwise. List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.).

 

NOMENCLATURE AND UNITS

Follow internationally accepted rules and conventions: use the international system of units (SI). If other quantities are mentioned, give their equivalent in SI. You are urged to consult IUPAC: Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: http://www.iupac.org/ for further information.

 

MATH FORMULAE

Please submit math equations as editable text and not as images. Present simple formulae in line with normal text where possible and use the solidus (/) instead of a horizontal line for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y. In principle, variables are to be presented in italics. Powers of e are often more conveniently denoted by exp. Number consecutively any equations that have to be displayed separately from the text (if referred to explicitly in the text).

 

FOOTNOTES

Footnotes should be used sparingly. Number them consecutively throughout the article. Many word processors can build footnotes into the text, and this feature may be used. Otherwise, please indicate the position of footnotes in the text and list the footnotes themselves separately at the end of the article. Do not include footnotes in the Reference list.

 

TABLES

Please submit tables as editable text and not as images. Tables can be placed either next to the relevant text in the article, or on separate page(s) at the end. Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text and place any table notes below the table body. Be sparing in the use of tables and ensure that the data presented in them do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article. Please avoid using vertical rules.

 

REFERENCES

Citation in text

Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text. If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either 'Unpublished results' or 'Personal communication'. Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

 

 Web references

As a minimum, the full URL should be given and the date when the reference was last accessed. Any further information, if known (DOI, author names, dates, reference to a source publication, etc.), should also be given. Web references can be listed separately (e.g., after the reference list) under a different heading if desired, or can be included in the reference list.

 

 References in a special issue

Please ensure that the words 'this issue' are added to any references in the list (and any citations in the text) to other articles in the same Special Issue.

 

REFERENCE MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE

Most journals have their reference template available in many of the most popular reference management software products. These include all products that support Citation Style Language styles (http://citationstyles.org), such as Mendeley (http://www.mendeley.com/features/reference-manager) and Zotero (https://www.zotero.org/), as well as EndNote (http://endnote.com/downloads/styles). Using the word processor plug-ins from these products, authors only need to select the appropriate journal template when preparing their article, after which citations and bibliographies will be automatically formatted in the journal's style. If no template is yet available for this journal, please follow the format of the sample references and citations as shown in this Guide. Users of Mendeley Desktop can easily install the reference style for this journal by clicking the following link: http://open.mendeley.com/use-citation-style/journal-of-aerosol-science When preparing your manuscript, you will then be able to select this style using the Mendeley plugins for Microsoft Word or LibreOffice.

 

 REFERENCE STYLE

Text: Citations in the text should follow the referencing style used by the American Psychological Association. You are referred to the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, Sixth Edition, ISBN 978-1-4338-0561-5, copies of which may be ordered from http://books.apa.org/books.cfm?id=4200067 or APA Order Dept., P.O.B. 2710, Hyattsville, MD 20784, USA or APA, 3 Henrietta Street, London, WC3E 8LU, UK.

 

List of references should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary. More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters 'a', 'b', 'c', etc., placed after the year of publication.

 

SUBMISSION PREPARATION CHECKLIST

Essential title page information

Title

  • Concise and informative. Titles are often used in information-retrieval systems. Avoid abbreviations and formulae where possible.

Author names and affiliations.

  • Please clearly indicate the given name(s) and family name(s) of each author and check that all names are accurately spelled.
  • Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lowercase superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address.
  • Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name and, if available, the e-mail address of each author.

Corresponding author.

  • Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication.
  • Ensure that the e-mail address is given and that contact details are kept up to date by the corresponding author.

Abstract

  • A concise and factual abstract is required. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions. An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be able to stand alone.
  • References should be avoided

Keywords

  • Immediately after the abstract, provide a maximum of 6 keywords, using American spelling and avoiding general and plural terms and multiple concepts (avoid, for example, 'and', 'of').
  • Be sparing with abbreviations: only abbreviations firmly established in the field may be eligible. These keywords will be used for indexing purposes.

Article structure

  • Subdivision - numbered sections
  • Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections. Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2, ...), 1.2, etc. (the abstract, acknoledgment,and references are not included in section numbering).

Math formulae

  • Please submit math equations as editable text and not as images.
  • Present simple formulae in line with normal text where possible and use the solidus (/) instead of a horizontal line for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y.
  • In principle, variables are to be presented in italics. Powers of e are often more conveniently denoted by exp. Number consecutively any equations that have to be displayed separately from the text (if referred to explicitly in the text)

Results

  • Results should be clear and concise.

Discussion

  • A combined Results and Discussion section is often appropriate. Avoid extensive citations and discussion of published literature.
  • This should explore the significance of the results of the work, not repeat them.

 

 

Tables

  • Please submit tables as editable text and not as images. Tables can be placed either next to the relevant text in the article, or on separate page(s) at the end.
  • Tables can be placed either next to the relevant text in the article, or on separate page(s) at the end.
  • Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text and place any table notes below the table body
  • Please avoid the use of prepositions “above”, “below” after the number tables indicating the position of table to the text.

References

  • Citation in text. Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa).
  • Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended in the reference list, but may be mentioned in the text.
  • If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either 'Unpublished results' or 'Personal communication'. Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication.

Reference style

  • Text: All citations in the text should refer to :
  1. Single author: the author's name (without initials, unless there is ambiguity) and the year of publication;
  2. Two authors: both authors' names and the year of publication;
  3. Three or more authors: first author's name followed by "et al." and the year of publication.
  • Citations may be made directly (or parenthetically). Groups of references should be listed first alphabetically, then chronologically.

Examples: "as demonstrated (Allan, 1996a, 1996b, 1999; Allan and Jones, 1995). Kramer et al. (2000) have recently shown ...."

  • List of References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary.
  • More than one reference from the same author(s) in the same year must be identified by the letters "a", "b", "c", etc., placed after the year of publication.

 

In-text APA citations typically appear at the end of the sentence, between the last word and the period.

Example of a parenthetical citations without the author’s name in the text:

Harlem had many artists and musicians in the late 1920s (Belafonte, 2008).

 

Example of a parenthetical citation when author is mentioned in the text:

According to Belafonte, Harlem was full of artists and musicians in the late 1920s (2008).

 

For parenthetical citations with two authors, format your parenthetical citation like this:

Rallying to restore sanity was a revolutionary undertaking (Stewart & Colbert, 2010).

 

For parenthetical citations with three to five authors: Include all names in the first in-text parenthetical citation, separated by commas and then an ampersand (&).

Rallying to restore sanity was a revolutionary undertaking (Stewart, Colbert, & Oliver, 2010).

 

For all subsequent in-text parenthetical citations, include only the first author, followed by “et al.” and the publication year if it is the first citation in a paragraph.

The event resulted in thousands of participants flocking to the National Mall in support of the cause (Stewart et al. 2010).

or

Stewart et al. (2010) state that the event resulted in thousands of participants flocking to the National Mall in support of the cause.

 

For parenthetical citations for six or more authors, include only the last name of the first author, followed by “et al.” and publication year in ALL parenthetical citations.

The study did not come to any definitive conclusions (Rothschild et al., 2013).

 

APA Styles Guideline for References

Book:

Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Title of work. Publisher City, State: Publisher.

James, H. (2009). The ambassadors. Rockville, MD: Serenity.

 

Chapter in a Print Book:

Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Title of chapter. In F. M. Editor (Ed.), Title of book (pp. xx-xx). Publisher City, State: Publisher.

Shuhua, L. (2007). The night of MidAutumn Festival. In J. S. M. Lau & H. Goldblatt (Eds.), The Columbia Anthology of Modern Chinese Literature (pp. 95-102). New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

E-Books:

Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Title of work [E-reader version]. Retrieved from URL

Stoker, B. (2000). Dracula [Kindle HDX version]. Retrieved from http://www.overdrive.com/

Chapter in an E-book:

Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Title of chapter. In F. M. Editor (Ed.), Title of book [E-reader version] (pp. xx-xx). Retrieved from URL or http://dx.doi.org/xxxx

Journals found on a database or online:

Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Article title. Journal Title, Volume Number(Issue Number), pp.-pp. http://dx.doi.org/xxxx or Retrieved from homepage URL

Trier, J. (2007). “Cool” engagements with YouTube: Part 2. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 50(7), 598-603. http://dx.doi.org/10.1598/JAAL.50.7.8

 

Journals found in print:

Author, F. M., Author, F. M. & Author, F. M. (Year of Publication). Article title. Journal Title, Volume(Issue Number), page range.

Lin, M.G., Hoffman, E.S., & Borengasser, C. (2013). Is social media too social for class? A case study of Twitter use. Tech Trends, 57(2), 39-45.

Magazine:

Last, F. M. (Date Published). Article title. Magazine Title, Volume(Issue), Page(s).

Website:

Last, F. M. (Date Published). Web page title. Retrieved from Homepage URL

Newspaper:

Last, F. M. (Year, Month Day published). Article title. Newspaper Title, Page(s).

Funding Sources

Any funds used to support the research of the manuscript should be placed here.

Notes

Any additional relevant notes should be placed here.

Abbreviations

SL, Science Learning; SPS, Science Process Skills.

 

Further considerations

  • Manuscript has been 'spell-checked' and 'grammar-checked' using word processing.
  • References are in the correct format for this journal
  • All references mentioned in the Reference list are cited in the text, and vice versa
  • Permission has been obtained for use of copyrighted material from other sources (including the Internet)
  • Printed version of figures (if applicable) in color or black-and-white. Indicate clearly whether or not color or black-and-white in print is required.
  • There is no grammatical and typographycal errors
  1. The active and passive sentences must be presented clearly.
  2. Checking the coordinating conjuction, subcoordinating conjunction, transitional expression.
  3. Checking the grammar rule of past tense, simple present, present perfect.
  4. Checking the grammar rule and style written english

Eg. count-uncount noun, gerund, adjective with the linking verb, dual comparisons, comparative sentences, causative verbs, subjunctive, inclusives (not only,… but also, as well as, both … and…), transitive-intransitive verbs, dependent-independent clauses, antecedent of pronouns, the parallel structure of sentence, direct-indirect objects

Acknowledgements

  • Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article before the references and do not, therefore, include them on the title page, as a footnote to the title or otherwise.
  • List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.).